MCC NOTIFICATION

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MCC not raising its 2021 property tax rate

Mohave Wire

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Mohave Community College will not increase its portion of the county property tax rate this year.

The decision was made in large part due to the financial hardship the pandemic is causing residents and communities in the college district.

“The board feels, and I agree, this crisis has altered the current economic landscape of the district, and we as a college are in this with our communities,” said MCC President Dr. Stacy Klippenstein. “The college provides services to help improve the lives of our students and our communities, and right now we feel that not raising the college portion of the property tax rate is the correct decision to make for everyone.”

He also points out that wise fiscal management has left the college in a position to absorb the loss of the approximately $500,000 dollars that a tax increase would have raised to help MCC cover the rising costs of college services required to serve more students.

Dr. Julie Bare, president of the college board of trustees agreed. She said the college has zero debt and will be able to manage a short term loss in funding.

“Our primary reserve coupled with a significant increase in new construction in Mohave County is sufficient to address next year’s budget, allowing the college to continue to provide quality education for students,” said Bare, who in addition to being the MCC board president, has been a Mohave county resident since 1966. “We are proud of the overall financial health of the college as measured by Higher Learning Commission Standards and anticipate using our new strategic plan to increase educational attainment throughout our communities.”

If the college had raised its portion of the property tax levy, the owner of a $200,000 home in Mohave County would have paid three dollars more on their property tax bill next year versus the college not raising the rate.

The college will hold annual budget information sessions for the public, as it did this past January. Announcements about meeting times and locations will be publicized on the college website, social media pages, and sent to local media.

If you have questions about your property tax assessment you are encouraged to contact the Mohave County Assessor.

MCC not raising property tax levy next year

Mohave Community College will not increase its portion of the county property tax rate this year.

The decision was made in large part due to the financial hardship the pandemic is causing residents and communities in the college district.

“The board feels, and I agree, this crisis has altered the current economic landscape of the district, and we as a college are in this with our communities,” said MCC President Dr. Stacy Klippenstein. “The college provides services to help improve the lives of our students and our communities, and right now we feel that not raising the college portion of the property tax rate is the correct decision to make for everyone.”

He also points out that wise fiscal management has left the college in a position to absorb the loss of the approximately $500,000 dollars that a tax increase would have raised to help MCC cover the rising costs of college services required to serve more students.

Dr. Julie Bare, president of the college board of trustees agreed. She said the college has zero debt and will be able to manage a short term loss in funding.

“Our primary reserve coupled with a significant increase in new construction in Mohave County is sufficient to address next year’s budget, allowing the college to continue to provide quality education for students,” said Bare, who in addition to being the MCC board president, has been a Mohave county resident since 1966. “We are proud of the overall financial health of the college as measured by Higher Learning Commission Standards and anticipate using our new strategic plan to increase educational attainment throughout our communities.”

If the college had raised its portion of the property tax levy, the owner of a $200,000 home in Mohave County would have paid three dollars more on their property tax bill next year versus the college not raising the rate.

The college will hold annual budget information sessions for the public, as it did this past January. Announcements about meeting times and locations will be publicized on the college website, social media pages, and sent to local media.

If you have questions about your property tax assessment you are encouraged to contact the Mohave County Assessor.